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Investigations can reveal some very sensitive & personal data. This intel is assessed by us & closely guarded used only for the purpose of fullfilling the needs of our clients to achieve the results we are commissioned to undertake More »

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We are proud to have access to the finest team members & discreet qualified persons who pride themselves in obtaining results for our clients where others fail. More »

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Scientific apparatus & technical staff allow us to get sensitive & usefull information by utilizing the latest technology in getting information for our clients.The storage, use & availability of this data is done with great care More »

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In these days of world wide communications being at a peak of efficiency, the task of passing on & receiving information in the blink of an eye becomes possible between our team members & the network we have access to More »

Team leader & CEO of the intel agencies group is Donna-Lee Sapiecha Eyers

Donna-Lee is here at her graduation law degree ceremony proudly supported by her mother Karen, her sister Sharah-Lee & father Henry More »

 

‘Tens of thousands’ of Australian firms may be affected by Chinese huge hack attack

One of the nation’s top cyber security officials has warned that “tens of thousands” of Australian companies could have been compromised by Chinese intelligence services’ hacking of major global technology firms.

“It’s the biggest and most audacious campaign I’ve seen,” said Alastair MacGibbon, the head of the government’s Australian Cyber Security Centre.

German manufacturers lose $50B to cyber attacks, SMBs at greatest risk

A quarter of German manufacturing companies reported losing sensitive mobile phone data, according to a Bitkom survey.

Two-thirds of German manufacturers have faced cyberattacks, racking up $50 billion in costs, according to a Bitkom survey released on Thursday. Acting as Europe’s largest economy, Germany has recently been a hot bed for cyber criminals.

Bitkom surveyed 503 managers and security chiefs from Germany’s entire manufacturing sector, determining SMBs—the economy’s main backbone—to be the most vulnerable to attacks, Reuters reported in a Thursday press release.

SEE: Cybersecurity strategy research: Common tactics, issues with implementation, and effectiveness (Tech Pro Research)

As one of the top exporters worldwide, Germany has been a long-time focus for hackers in competing economies. In fact, German security officials have been trying to shed light on cyberattack threats for a long time, said the release, warning government administrators about foreign spy agencies that may look to steal Germany’s manufacturing strategies.

“With its worldwide market leaders, German industry is particularly interesting for criminals,” Bitkom head Achim Berg said in a statement, reported Reuters. With such a dominate manufacturing economy, German companies needed to take cybersecurity seriously, said the release.

A third of German companies also reported mobile phones being stolen, and a quarter of companies admitted losing sensitive digital data in the process, said the release. Additionally, 19% of companies reported their IT and production systems had been compromised, and 11% said their communication systems were tapped, added the release.

Check out this TechRepublic article for tips on how to improve your organization’s cybersecurity.

The big takeaways for tech leaders:

  • Two-thirds of German manufacturers lost $50 billion to cyberattacks. — Bitkom, 2018.
  • A third of German companies said their mobile phones had been stolen, and a quarter reported losing sensitive data. — Bitkom, 2018.

Also see

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Henry Sapiecha

17 Sep 2018 2:54 PM AEST – Review of the Crimes Legislation Amendment (Police Powers at Airports) Bill 2018

The Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS) has commenced an inquiry into the Crimes Legislation Amendment (Police Powers at Airports) Bill 2018.  The Bill was introduced into the House of Representatives on 12 September 2018 and referred to the Committee for inquiry and report by the Minister for Home Affairs.

The PJCIS Chair, Mr Andrew Hastie MP, said:

Australian airports are among the safest in the world. However recent events—including the July 2017 aviation terrorist plot targeting international flights departing Sydney—have identified that more can be done to assist law enforcement officers in the protection of our aviation network.

The Bill allows police at certain airports to direct a person to provide evidence of their identity, and empowers officers to direct a person to leave an airport, or not take a flight, for up to 24 hours.

In its inquiry, the Committee will consider the adequacy of the current powers of police at airports, review the new powers, and examine the appropriate safeguards.

The Committee is currently accepting submissions to this review. Submissions should be provided no later than Friday, 5 October 2018. If you intend to make a submission, please contact the Secretariat at PJCIS@aph.gov.au by Tuesday 25 September to assist with planning.

Further information on the inquiry can be obtained from the Committee’s website.

Media enquiries:
Chair, Mr Andrew Hastie MP (Canning, WA) on 08 9534 8044 (Electorate office) or (02) 6277 4223 (Parliament House)

For background information:
Committee Secretariat – Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security

(02) 6277 2360
pjcis@aph.gov.au

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Henry Sapiecha

Australian Government Migration Committee to discuss education agents at hearing

Federal Parliament’s Migration Committee will be holding a public hearing in Canberra on 22 August 2018 as part of its inquiry into the efficacy of current regulation of Australian migration agents.

International education provisionally contributed $32.2 billion to the Australian economy with over 624,000 students studying in Australia. Education agents play a significant role in Australia’s education export sector recruiting overseas students on behalf of education providers. Education agents are involved in almost three-quarters of all international enrolments.

Committee Chair Jason Wood MP said, “the Committee received anecdotal evidence on the fraudulent actions of some unscrupulous education agents as part of its inquiry.

“It’s important that we examine the effectiveness of Australia’s quality assurance framework to protect the interests of international students and consider mechanisms designed to take appropriate enforcement action against education agents engaging in fraudulent or misleading practices”, Mr Wood said.

The Committee will hear evidence from the Department of Education and Training and the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission.

The inquiry is examining issues including:

  • examining the registration and regulation of migration agents in Australia including: education, English proficiency, payment, fee-scheduling as well as the suitability and stringency of the accreditation process and evidence of deficiencies.
  • the nature and prevalence of fraud, professional misconduct and other breaches by registered migration agents, the current review mechanisms for migration agents and the adequacy of penalties.
  • deficiencies and barriers to relevant authorities’ investigation of fraudulent behaviour by registered migration agents in visa applications, including the adequacy of information and evidence sharing between such authorities.
  • evidence of the volumes and patterns of unregistered migration agents and education agents providing unlawful immigration services in Australia.
  • reviewing the appropriateness of migration agents providing other services to clients.

The Committee will also examine integrity issues associated with the Electronic Travel Authority visa.

The full terms of reference are available on the Committee’s website.

Public hearing details: 10.10 am to 11.10 am, Wednesday 22 August 2018, Committee Room 1R4, Parliament House, Canberra.

The hearing will be broadcast live at aph.gov.au/live

Media enquiries:
Office of Jason Wood MP
(03) 9768 9164

For background information:
Joint Standing Committee on Migration
(02) 6277 4560
migration@aph.gov.au

Interested members of the public may wish to track the committee via the website. Click on the blue ‘Track Committee’ button in the bottom right hand corner and use the forms to login to My Parliament or to register for a My Parliament account.

Media release issue date: 17 AUGUST 2018

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Henry Sapiecha

Australian Government Review of the relisting of five terrorist organisations

The Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security has commenced a review of the relisting of the following five organisations as terrorist organisations under the Criminal Code:

  • Al-Shabaab, a Somali militant group affiliated with al-Qa’ida that aims to establish an Islamic state in Somalia based on Islamic law, and to eliminate foreign ‘infidel’ influence;
  • Hamas’ Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades, which seek to establish a Palestinian Islamist state comprising Gaza, the West Bank and Israel;
  • Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), a Kurdish nationalist movement that calls for autonomy for Kurds within Turkey and the right to maintain a Kurdish ethnic identity;
  • Lashkar-e-Tayyiba, a Pakistan-based Sunni extremist organisation that aims to unite Indian administered Kashmir with Pakistan under a radical interpretation of Islamic law; and
  • Palestinian Islamic Jihad, a Sunni Islamist organisation committed to the destruction of the state of Israel.

The Government proscribed all five organisations on 4 August 2018.

Under section 102.1A of the Criminal Code, the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security may review listings of terrorist organisations and report on the Committee’s findings within the 15 sitting day parliamentary disallowance period.

The Committee is currently accepting submissions to this review. Submissions should be provided no later than Tuesday, 31 August 2018.

Further information on each review can be obtained from the Committee’s website.

Media enquiries:
Chair, Mr Andrew Hastie MP (Canning, WA) on 08 9534 8044 (Electorate office) or (02) 6277 4223 (Parliament House)

For background information:
Committee Secretariat – Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security –
(02) 6277 2360
pjcis@aph.gov.au

Interested members of the public may wish to track the committee via the website. Click on the blue ‘Track Committee’ button in the bottom right hand corner and use the forms to login to My Parliament or to register for a My Parliament account.

www.crimefiles.net

Henry Sapiecha

15 Aug 2018 Held. Public hearing for review of Office of National Intelligence bills

The Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security held a public hearing as part of its review of the Office of National Intelligence Bill 2018 and the Office of National Intelligence (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2018.

The bills implement recommendations of the 2017 Independent Intelligence Review.

The Committee heard from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Office of National Assessments and Department of Home Affairs.

Public hearing details: 4.00pm to 5.00pm, Thursday, 16 August 2018, Committee Room 1R4, Parliament House, Canberra.

The hearing is broadcast live at aph.gov.au/live

Media enquiries: Chair, Mr Andrew Hastie MP (Canning, WA) on 08 9534 8044 (Electorate Office) or 02 6277 4223 (Parliament House)

The Committee intends to report on both bills on 10 September 2018.

Further information about the Committee’s review and submissions received to date can be obtained from the Committee’s website. Interested members of the public may wish to track the committee via the website. Click on the blue ‘Track Committee’ button in the bottom right hand corner and use the forms to login to My Parliament or to register for a My Parliament account.

The Secretariat can be contacted on 02 6277 2360 or by emailing pjcis@aph.gov.au.

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Henry Sapiecha

Canberra gives ‘decryption’ yet again another crack with draft legislation

The Australian government is still committed to ‘no backdoors’, publishing draft legislation that will force internet companies to assist law enforcement in decrypting messages sent with end-to-end encryption.

The Australian federal government has finally outlined in detail how it plans to access encrypted communications, publishing draft legislation more than a year since Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced his intentions to do so.

In a bid to address the “serious challenges posed by current communications technology to law enforcement and national security investigations”, the Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) Bill 2018 [PDF] is described by the government as demanding “critical assistance” from the communications industry thus enabling law enforcement to effectively investigate serious crimes in this digital era.

The Bill, opened to the public for consultation, introduces measures that the government said will greatly improve the ability of agencies to access intelligible communications content and data.

As outlined in the explanatory document [PDF], three reforms will help achieve such purpose, with the first enhancing the obligations of domestic providers to give “reasonable assistance” to Australia’s key law enforcement and security agencies, extending assistance obligations to offshore providers supplying communications services and devices in Australia.

The Bill will also introduce new computer access warrants for law enforcement that will enable them to “covertly obtain evidence directly from a device”, while also strengthening the ability of law enforcement and security authorities to overtly access data through existing search and seizure warrants.

Turnbull, along with his then Attorney-General George Brandis, announced plans in July last year to introduce the legislation that would force internet companies to assist law enforcement in decrypting messages sent with end-to-end encryption.

Questioning whether the proposed legislation was technically possible, wet asked the prime minister if the laws of mathematics would trump the laws of Australia.

“The laws of Australia prevail in Australia, I can assure you of that,” Turnbull told us. “The laws of mathematics are very commendable, but the only law that applies in Australia is the law of Australia.”

During his media rounds, Turnbull made sure he let Australia know that his intention was to protect the nation against terrorism and to protect the community from criminal rings such as those involved in paedophilia, rather than nutting out the technical specs of the laws modelled on the UK’s snoopers’ charter.

With the legislation’s oversight now given to the Minister for Law Enforcement and Cyber Security Angus Taylor, his statement on Tuesday focused on protecting Australians with the legislation, saying again that technologies including encryption are increasingly being used by paedophiles, terrorists, and organised criminals to conceal their illicit activities.

“We know that more than 90 percent of data lawfully intercepted by the Australian Federal Police now uses some form of encryption. This has directly impacted around 200 serious criminal and terrorism-related investigations in the last 12 months alone,” he said.

“We must ensure our laws reflect the rapid take-up of secure online communications by those who seek to do us harm. These reforms will allow law enforcement and interception agencies to access specific communications without compromising the security of a network.”

According to Taylor, the measures in the Bill “expressly prevent” the weakening of encryption or the introduction of backdoors.

“I am committed to maintaining the integrity of Australians’ personal information, devices, and communications,” he continued.

“Our first priority is keeping Australians safe and these measures will go a long way to ensure that criminals cannot hide.”

The draft legislation is open for public discussion until September 10, 2018.

PREVIOUS AND RELATED COVERAGE

Australia’s semantic sleight of hand on encrypted messaging revealed

Newly-released documents confirm that the Australian government’s commitment to ‘no backdoors’ to weaken encryption algorithms doesn’t preclude backdoors elsewhere in the secure messaging pipeline.

Australian government committed to ‘no backdoors’: Taylor

‘We simply don’t need to weaken encryption in order to get what we need,’ says cyber security minister Angus Taylor, but trust in our civilisation is crumbling.

Thou shalt be secure: RSA says you can’t force private sector to break encryption

RSA’s VP and GM of Global Public Sector Practice Mike Brown believes there’s a better way to thwart terrorism than breaking end-to-end encryption, as recently proposed by the Australian government.

Australia called out as willing to undermine human rights for digital agenda

A report from AccessNow has asked Australia to change its course and lead the way in serving as a champion for human rights instead of against.

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Henry Sapiecha

Public hearing held on 15th June 2018 – Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security

Following recent amendments to the Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme Bill 2017 the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security has held additional public hearings for its review of the bill.

The bill establishes a scheme that requires registration by persons who undertake certain activities within Australia on behalf of foreign interests.

Public hearing details: Was held on Monday, 18th June 2018 Committee Room 2S1, Parliament House, Canberra

The Committee heard from the following witnesses:

Universities Australia, Community Council for Australia,Law Council of Australia, Oxfam Australia and Pew Charitable Trusts, Brett Walker SC

Further information, including submissions made to the inquiry, may be found on the Committee’s website at www.aph.gov.au/pjcis.

Media enquiries:
Chair, Mr Andrew Hastie MP (Canning, WA) on 08 9534 8044 (Electorate office) or (02) 6277 4223 (Parliament House)

For background information:
Committee Secretariat – Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security –
(02) 6277 2360 or pjcis@aph.gov.au

Interested members of the public may wish to track the committee via the website. Click on the blue ‘Track Committee’ button in the bottom right hand corner and use the forms to login to My Parliament or to register for a My Parliament account.

www.ozrural.com.au

Henry Sapiecha

16 Aug 2018 8:54 AM AEST – Human Rights Law Centre to speak on Identity-matching Services Bills

The Joint Intelligence and Security Committee will hold a second public hearing in Canberra tomorrow as part of its review of the Identity-matching Services Bill 2018 and the Australian Passports Amendment (Identity-matching Services) Bill 2018.

The Committee will hear from the Human Rights Law Centre, the Australian Strategic Policy Institute and the Department of Home Affairs.

Committee Chair Mr Andrew Hastie MP said that the Committee looks forward to hearing from the Human Rights Law Centre and the Australian Strategic Policy Institute.

“It is important that the Committee hear from these organisations. The Committee is especially interested in the privacy implication of biometric identity-matching and their evidence will greatly assist the Committee in preparing its report on the Identity-matching Bills before it,” Mr Hastie said.

The Committee intends to report on both bills by mid-September.

Public hearing details: 8.30am to 12.00pm, August, 17 August 2018, Committee Room 1R4, Parliament House, Canberra.

8.30am                 Human Rights Law Centre

9.15am                 Break

9.30am                 Australian Strategic Policy Institute

10.15am               Break

10.40am               Department of Home Affairs

12.00pm               Close

The hearing will be broadcast live at aph.gov.au/live

Further information about the Committee’s reviews and the submissions received to date can be obtained from the Committee’s website.

Media enquiries:
Chair, Mr Andrew Hastie MP (Canning, WA) on 08 9534 8044 (Electorate office) or (02) 6277 4223 (Parliament House)

For background information:
Committee Secretariat – Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security – (02) 6277 2360 or email pjcis@aph.gov.au

Interested members of the public may wish to track the committee via the website. Click on the blue ‘Track Committee’ button in the bottom right hand corner and use the forms to login to My Parliament or to register for a My Parliament account.

www.ozrural.com.au

Henry Sapiecha

Some major Australian websites that aren’t secure

RENOWNED cyber security expert Troy Hunt has shamed some of Australia’s most visited websites for not being secure.

Among those that don’t encrypt the data travels between users and the website include Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology website, AFL.com.au, Whirlpool.com.au and the ABC website.

These websites are among a minority that do not use HTTPS – the secure version of the web’s underlying data transfer protocol. The ‘S’ part of the acronym is the important bit.

It stands for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure and is the protocol over which data is sent between your browser and the website that you are connected to.

The ‘S’ on the end means that communication between your browser and the website is encrypted before it travels online.

Web browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome display a padlock icon in the address bar in front of the web address to indicate that an HTTPS connection is in effect.

Alternatively, websites like the ABC and the BOM site rely on HTTP which doesn’t scramble the data passing between you and the site.

The information in the address bar warns users the website is not secure.

WHY ARE THESE WARNINGS COMING NOW?

Nothing about the way these websites work has changed but from today Google’s new Chrome web browser is listing all unencrypted sites as explicitly “not secure” in front of the web address. The change is part of the tech giant’s release of Chrome 68.

Google first began warning people about sites that use HTTP in early 2017 by displaying the “not secure” warning for sites that collected passwords and credit card information. The company has also subtlety favoured HTTPS-enabled sites in its search results since 2014.

Despite the push for greater encryption on the web, Mr Hunt and his colleague wanted to compile a list of major websites that still didn’t use HTTPS.

“After all the advanced warnings combined with all we know to be bad about serving even static sites over HTTP, what sort of sites are left that are neglecting such a fundamental security and privacy basic?” he wrote in his latest blog post.

The most visited Australian sites that remain unsecured as identified by Troy Hunt.

Many other, less visited sites, including the Government’s Australian Bureau of Statistics website also rely on HTTP.

About 20 per cent of the world’s 500 most popular websites are still using the non-secure protocol.

If you’re not entering any password or sharing personal data on these websites, then you don’t really need to worry too much as the risk that your security could be compromised is fairly minuscule.

But because the data carried between your device and the web server can be accessed by someone else on the network, theoretically cyber-criminals can work to intercept that information and devise ways to steal useful data or insert their own code or malicious adverts.

www.scamsfakes.com

Henry Sapiecha