Top cop Nick Kaldas claims ‘massive wrongdoing’ and cover-up in police bugging of his children scandal

Subject of 'intense electronic and other surveillance': Police Deputy Commissioner Nick Kaldas, far right.

Deputy police commissioner Nick Kaldas has accused an internal affairs unit formerly run by two of NSW’s most senior officers – Commissioner Andrew Scipione and his deputy, Catherine Burn – of “massive wrongdoing and habitual illegal acts” in relation to a covert bugging operation more than a decade ago.

In a submission to a parliamentary inquiry examining the operation, codenamed Mascot, Mr Kaldas also sensationally claims illegal activities by the police Special Crime and Internal Affairs (SCIA) unit were “sanctioned and covered up” by the Police Integrity Commission.

Mr Kaldas was one of more than 100 police and civilians bugged by Operation Mascot between 1999-2001.

Mr Scipione was commander of SCIA  at the time, while Ms Burn was head of the team which ran Operation Mascot.

The operation exploded into controversy when it emerged at least one journalist and police not under suspicion of wrongdoing were among those whose names appeared on covert surveillance warrants issued by the Supreme Court.

An internal police operation, Strike Force Emblems, was launched into Operation Mascot in 2003. Its report has never been released, although details have been previously revealed by Fairfax Media.

In his submission Mr Kaldas says documents submitted to the committee show “a level of intense electronic and other surveillance [was] … carried out on every part of my life, home and work, including my ex-wife and children, and was clearly unjustified but in the end yielded not one allegation to be put to me at the end of the operation”.

The submission was published on Thursday morning, as the parliamentary inquiry began hearings into a two-year investigation by the NSW Ombudsman Bruce Barbour into Strike Force Emblems.

Mr Kaldas and Ms Burn are due to give evidence on Friday. Mr Scipione and Mr Barbour are scheduled to appear on Tuesday.

In her submission to the inquiry, Ms Burn strongly denied any wrongdoing.

Ms Burn denies she directed internal affairs police “to use illegal warrants to secretly record conversations of my rivals in the police force”, in particular Mr Kaldas, when she did not suspect him of wrongdoing.

Ms Burn also denied directing use of illegal warrants to bug Mr Kaldas “as part of a personal vendetta”.

The inquiry – which is opposed by the NSW government, was established in response to concerns about the time being taken for Mr Barbour to complete his investigations and the nature of his inquiries.

Earlier on Thursday, committee chairman Robert Borsak accused NSW attorney-general Brad Hazzard of seeking to “bribe” him into withdrawing from the inquiry, which the government opposes.

The inquiry heard from Channel Seven journalist Steve Barrett, whose name appeared on one of the bugging warrants.

Barrett said he was mystified as to why he appeared on the warrant but suggested that either Supreme Court judges had been “duped” or “no one checked”.

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Henry Sapiecha

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