Category Archives: GLOBAL STUFF

Five Eyes, Nine Eyes & 14-Eyes Countries and VPNs Important to know when using (or planning to use) a VPN

The content herein is part of an article published in a VPN site where at the end of this short introduction there will be a link to take you to a lot more viewpoints & info. ENJOY.

This article will discuss available VPNs in relation to the 5 Eyes, the 9 Eyes and the 14 Eyes government surveillance alliances.

Encryption is the only way to protect private communications. While there are encrypted messaging systems that can be used for direct correspondence, virtual private networks (VPNs, also based on encryption) are the best tools for hiding internet activity, such as which websites are visited. Again, there are valid reasons to do so: to protect the privacy of religion, sexual orientation and sensitive medical conditions; all of which can be inferred from visited websites.

Background

During the second world war, US and UK intelligence agencies worked closely on code-breaking. After the war, the UK center at Bletchley Park evolved into the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). The American service evolved into the National Security Agency (NSA). In 1946, the working relationship between the two countries was formalized in the UKUSA agreement. It worked on signals intelligence (SIGINT); that is, the interception and analysis of adversarial telecommunications.

In order to provide global coverage for communications interception, Australia, New Zealand and Australia joined the UK and the USA – and became known as the Five Eyes.

However, such is the NSA’s global dominance of intelligence gathering, other countries have sought to cooperate in return for specific ‘threat’ information from the NSA. This has led to other SIGINT groupings: the 9 Eyes and the 14 Eyes.

The operation of these intelligence agencies was long kept secret. As global communications have increased – and as perceived threats have grown (first in the Cold War between east and west and more recently in the ‘war on terror’), the 5 Eyes in particular began to secretly use technology to gather everything for later analysis. GCHQ, for example, had a secret project called Mastering the Internet. None of this was publicly known.

In 2013, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden leaked thousands of top secret NSA and GCHQ documents showing, for the first time, the extent to which national governments spy on everybody. It is always done in the name of ‘national security’, and both the relevant agencies and their governments insist on their right to do so.

MORE HERE

Henry Sapiecha

Telstra launching cybersecurity centres internationally

Telstra is utilising its ‘deep, deep skills in cyber’ by launching security operations centres in Sydney, Melbourne, and across the globe, as well as likely upgrading its existing facility in Canberra.

Telstra will be opening cybersecurity centres internationally following the launch of its security operations centres (SOCs) in Sydney and Melbourne over the next few weeks, CEO Andy Penn has announced.

Speaking during Telstra’s FY17 financial results call, Penn said Australia’s incumbent telecommunications provider is currently looking at locations for international SOCs, but would not disclose the sites.

However, he added that the two new Australian centres will be launching “very soon … in the coming weeks”.

“There’s no doubt that large enterprises and even smaller enterprises today are becoming increasingly concerned by cybersecurity risks that they face,” Penn told ZDNet.

“There’s virtually no technology innovation that’s happening today that isn’t intended to be connected. That means it’s across a network, and what’s critical is those innovations and that technology is protected from a cyber perspective.

“We’ve got deep, deep, deep skills in cyber because of our own need to protect our networks, but also we provide a very significant dynamic service for our enterprise customers, and this is really a significant investment in really building that service for our enterprise customers.”

Penn told ZDNet that Telstra will also likely upgrade its existing SOC in Canberra.

“We have a dynamic product offering which is integrated with some of the best data analytics globally and the best access to data globally, so that’s actually the fundamental offering, and then the security operations themselves actually enable ourselves on behalf of our customers, or our customers, to monitor 24/7 effectively the cyber activity on their networks,” Penn told ZDNet.

“You need the data analytics and you need the artificial intelligence and the machine learning capabilities to process what’s actually happening deeply at the network level, and you need the sensors deep within the network, and that’s the dynamic security offering that is already launched. We’ve already got customers on that who are very pleased with that offering, and then we’re supporting that with the security operations centres.”

Penn said Telstra has the “smartest” network in Australia, with the telco currently also upgrading its fibre-optic network to allow for terabit capacity.

“We have commenced the rollout of our next-gen optical fibre and transmission network; Tasmania was the first state to benefit from this upgrade,” the chief executive said.

“This will increase Telstra’s network capacity to 1 terabit per second, and has already done so on each of Telstra’s two subsea cables running across the Bass Strait. We’re already rolling this out to the rest of the country, and there is future potential to increase the capacity to 100 terabits per second.”

In addition, Penn spruiked the company’s Cat-M1 Internet of Things (IoT) network, built in conjunction with Ericsson and switched on earlier this month on the 4GX network.

“Cat-M1 will give us the platform for the significant growth we expect to see in IoT,” Penn said.

Telstra currently has more than 8,600 mobile towers, 5,000 telephone exchanges, 200,000 switches and routers, 240,000km of optical fibre cable, and 400,000km of submarine cable.

Telstra TV 2

Penn also announced the launch of the Telstra TV 2, saying that Telstra remains “committed to Foxtel” despite its dropping revenue and is in discussions with co-owner News Corp on how best to structure and arrange Foxtel in future.

“We’re about to dial it up again,” Penn said, detailing that the Telstra TV 2 will include all streaming and catch-up TV services along with a linked mobile app, making it “a real Australian first”.

“Access to the best content is critically important to us as demand for media continues to grow. At the same time, the media market is changing with new participants and increased competition,” Telstra added.

Telstra’s media revenue grew by 8.2 percent to AU$935 million thanks to uptake of both the Telstra TV and “Foxtel from Telstra”. Foxtel from Telstra made AU$777 million in revenue, growing by 8.1 percent due to 57,000 additional subscribers, and there are now 827,000 Telstra TV devices in the market.

Underpinning Telstra’s SOCs is its suite of managed security services announced in March and launched in July, Penn said, in addition to the company’s 500 “cybersecurity experts”.

The Telstra TV originally launched in October 2015.