Category Archives: online private data sale

Government’s plan to spy on all Australians exposed in leaked letters

It may shortly be far easier for government spies to access your private data. Photo source: Pixabay

We’re constantly being advised to protect our data and information online, but it turns out there may be even a greater threat & cause for concern.

An exclusive report by The Sunday Telegraph reveals our online data may not even be safe from the Australian Government. Australian citizens may soon be subjected to secret digital monitoring by the top cyber spy agency in the country with no warrant rerquired for accessing all your info when they feel like it.

This means everything from text messages to emails and even bank statements could be accessed in secret under the radical new proposed plan. The Sunday Telegraph viewed the secret letters between the heads of Department of Home Affairs and Defence. The letters detail possible new powers for the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD).

As the current rules stand, intelligence is not to be produced on Australian citizens. Having said that, the Australian Federal Police and domestic spy agency ASIO can investigate people with a warrant and also seek help from the ASD if needed in what are deemed to be extreme cases.

If the proposal is passed, it would be up to Defence Minister Marise Payne and Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton to allow spying to occur. Furthermore, they could approve cases without Australia’s top law officers being aware of it.

The Sunday Telegraph believes Dutton hasn’t yet presented Payne with any formal proposals for changes to the legislation. If passed though, spies would be given permission to secretly access information relating to an Australian citizens’ financial data, health information and phone records. A change in law would mean it’s also illegal for government agencies and private businesses to hold back any information that could hinder the security measures.

The Sunday Telegraph believes the reason for the data crackdown would be to stop terrorism, child exploitation and other serious crimes being conducted both here in Australia and overseas.

Several times in recent months online data and its safety has made headlines. Earlier this year, Facebook came under fire for breaching privacy data rules. As it stands, anything you share or access online remains there, even if you delete it.

This means any photos, emails, website history, online comments and videos you upload or view are stored away somewhere in cyberspace. Worryingly, any information shared on a social media platform such as Facebook will remain with the company, even if your profile is deleted.

What are your thoughts? Have you concerns that your private information could be secretly accessed by spies and the government? Do you think it’s really to protect Australians, or just another feeble excuse for the government to gain more information about us? Big brother is going too far this time one would think. Write to your MP.

Henry Sapiecha

MySpace hackers place another 427 million passwords up for sale

Password theft should make victims change credentials they have re-used for other sites.

security-lock-abstract-thumb image www.intelagencies.com

In another haunting hack from the past, Time Inc. has confirmed the theft of 427 million passwords from MySpace, the aging social networking site the media company acquired just three months ago.

The records were offered for sale on the dark web by the same hacker who posted for sale a trove of 117 million stolen LinkedIn passwords nearly two weeks ago. The posted price for MySpace credentials is 6 bit coins or about $3,200 at today’s rate.

The MySpace incident is tied to a June 11, 2013 hack, according to LeakedSource, while the LinkedIn episode dated back to 2012. LeakedSource is the same web site that confirmed the LinkedIn theft.

The important similarity of these dated incidents lies in the fact that hackers could use these recently posted stolen passwords to break into current accounts of victims who re-use passwords across many sites, including banking and health services.

The recent 2016 Verizon Data Breach Investigation Report showed that 63% of confirmed data breaches involved weak, default or stolen passwords.

Social media users made light of the aging passwords, including Paul Hosford, a reporter with the Irish media site thejournal, “If MySpace hackers have managed to get hold of my password, can they tell me what it is?”

But even past its prime, MySpace reports today 50 million visitors per month. On its blog, MySpace said the stolen passwords have been inactivated on its site, and it encouraged users to set new passwords on accounts where they used the same or similar password from their MySpace account.

LeakedSource reported that the MySpace passwords were stored in SHA1 with no salting, a process that makes decrypting passwords exponentially harder. MySpace confirmed the stolen data included user login data “from a portion of accounts that were created prior to June 11, 2013.”

Time Inc., which own titles such as Fortune and Sports Illustrated, acquired MySpace when it bought parent company Viant Technology in February. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but at the time Time Inc. chairman and CEO Joe Ripp, said, “This acquisition is game changing for us.” Today, the change seems to be dealing with a major hack of private account data.

Since its heyday early in this century as the world’s largest social media site, MySpace was acquired in 2005 by News Corp. for $580 million and again in 2011 for $35 million by Justin Timberlake and Specific Media Group.

www.socialselect.net

7745

www.scamsfakes.com

Henry Sapiecha